How to use different products

How to use different products

Wash, clean, catheterise, discard-no matter which catheter you use. View step-by step guides on the catheterisation procedure.

How to insert a catheter – for men

How to insert a catheter – for men

Learn how to safely insert a catheter Find out more

Before starting to empty your bladder, always gather your supplies as instructed by your doctor or nurse.

Prepare for catheterisation

  1. Wash your hands well and dry them.

  2. Gently clean the head of the penis and the penis tip (use mild soap and water or a disinfectant wipe).

  3. Open your catheter and prepare it according to the instructions for use supplied by the manufacturer.

  4. Gently insert the catheter into the urethra until urine starts to flow.

  5. Once the urine stops running, begin to withdraw the catheter slowly while slightly rotating it. If you are using a curved tip catheter (coudé), do not rotate.

  6. Stop briefly each time more urine drains out. Move a little and straighten yourself up to make sure the bladder is completely empty.

  7. Throw away the catheter after using it (as household waste) and wash your hands once more.

    Before use, always consult the IFU iconInstructions For Use document delivered with the products.
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How to insert a catheter – for women

How to insert a catheter – for women

Learn how to safely insert a catheter Find out more

Gather your supplies

Before starting to empty your bladder, always gather your supplies as instructed by your doctor or nurse.

Wash your hands well and dry them.
Separate the labia and gently clean the area around the urethral opening (use mild soap and water or a disinfectant wipe).
Open your catheter and prepare it according to the instructions for use supplied by the manufacturer.
Gently insert the catheter into the urethra until urine starts to flow.
Once the urine stops running, begin to withdraw the catheter slowly while slightly rotating it.

Stop briefly each time more urine drains out. Move a little and straighten yourself up to make sure the bladder is completely empty.
Throw away the catheter after using it (household waste) and wash your hands once more.

Before use, always consult the IFU iconInstructions For Use  document delivered with the products.

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What if I’m in a public toilet?

What if I’m in a public toilet?

Learn how to go about catheterisation when you have to do it outside your own home Find out more
Randal: Discretion in catheterisation is important to me because people don't need to know how you're going to the toilet or what differences you have compared to everyone else. There are a lot of people out there that I pass on the street every day that I wouldn’t know have the same issues, and they have no idea that I do either. Being able to pop a catheter in my pocket and just go to the toilet and use it like anyone else goes to the toilet just frees up your lifestyle, means you can get out of the house and not be stuck at home wondering how long you'll be until you get to the next toilet.

Catheterisation hygiene rules

The same rules of hygiene apply everywhere – both at home and on the go. If you need to touch anything after you wash your hands such as the door handle (or the hand rims, if you’re in a wheel chair) – it’s important to use hand-sanitising gel or wash again. Many people find it helpful to keep needed supplies in a bag. It’s also a good idea to keep extra supplies in the car or at work.

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What if I find catheterising difficult?

What if I find catheterising difficult?

Here are some troubleshooting tips for catheterisation Learn more

Julian: The actual physical act of catheterizing yourself is simple; it’s very straightforward. However, the first hurdle was the acceptance of having to do it. The second part is… ‘what happens when I go out?’. Slowly, you start to think that it’s not that bad.

When you’re first learning to do clean intermittent self-catheterisation, it’s not unusual to encounter difficulties. Here are some common issues others who catheterise have dealt with:

Women: how do I find the urethral opening?

A hand-held mirror can be very useful. Always carry one with you.

What if I experience pain when inserting the catheter?

It may be uncomfortable when first starting to use intermittent self-catheterisation. Try to relax, take a deep breath and try one more time. If the discomfort continues or you are experiencing pain, you should inform your doctor or nurse immediately. There are different types of catheters – maybe you would benefit from trying another type. Your doctor or nurse can tell you more about your options.

 

What if I can’t reach the toilet?

This type of challenge can occur especially if you’re in a wheelchair. You can use a set solution, which is a catheter with a pre-connected urine bag or you can attach your catheter to a urine bag.

What if I have trouble handling the catheter?

If you have limited hand dexterity due to, for example, a spinal cord injury, you might find it difficult to handle a catheter. Together with your doctor or nurse you should look at different catheter options that could enable you to catheterise yourself. Perhaps a slightly firmer catheter will be easier to handle, or ask for one with a bigger grip/handle.

Vision problems or other physical challenges:

If you have vision problems, limited hand dexterity or other physical challenges it can sometimes be difficult to use intermittent catheters. However, it’s very likely that you can still learn the technique. Talk to your doctor or nurse for suggestions, and don’t be discouraged. Once you do master intermittent catheterisation, it will offer much more freedom in your daily life.

If you want to know more about the features of the different products, give us a call.


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